13 July 2010 ~ 1 Comment

Public Art Proposals: MOS

Here are perfect bite size samples from the San Francisco Arts Commission (SFAC) of the “landmark” and “wayfinding” artist proposals for Moscone (MOS) Station. The public comment period will end on Friday, July 16, 2010, so we hope you will take the time to pay a visit and give the SFAC’s Public Art Program your feedback! For the viewing of the actual proposals, please visit the exhibit location at the following address:

 Contemporary Jewish Museum
736 Mission Street
Operating hours: Monday-Tuesday, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.;
Wednesday, closed; Thursday, 1-8 p.m.;
Friday-Sunday, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

 The following are the artist proposals displayed for the MOS station:

 Landmark Proposals

(Untitled)

(Untitled)

Artist: Brian Tolle
Title: (Untitled)
“Passengers ebb and flow through train stations, not unlike the fog that rolls in and out of San Francisco each morning and night. I propose the creation of landmark artworks that celebrate these phenomena. Using computer generated models and state of the art CNC router technologies, molds will be generated to create unique works that depict single moments of a surface seemingly in motion. The works proposed will be cast in translucent fiberglass.”

Flocking

Flocking

Artist: Joyce Hsu
Title: Flocking
“The average commuter may spend up to five hours a week in a transit station for their daily migration. For me, these spaces are hardly inspiring of dreams. But what if commuters were presented with a flock of jet-pack flying devices (ornithopters) with bird-like wings against the backdrop of a dreamlike sky? The artwork would be the embodiment of both the imaginative (flying) and natural landscape (marshland) into the constructed environment (station). It will become a strong icon for the station, offering commuters a reminder of their dreams and an opportunity to dissect that eternal problem up close. The installation will be aesthetically intriguing, and become synonymous with the vibrancy of South of Market.”

Arc Cycle (working title)

Arc Cycle (working title)

Artist: Catherine Wagner
Title: Arc Cycle (working title)
“In the late 1970s I photographed  the beginning of the construction of the Moscone Center. My interest was not in the convention center as it stands today, rather it was the process of construction that speaks to the idea of change, a common denominator in all of our lives.  For the new Moscone Central Subway Station, I propose to transform images from the series George Moscone Site into large-scale photographic drawings that are seen as sculptural reliefs.  These would span the concourse wall from the turnstiles to the elevator shaft (concourse end, concourse side wall).  The images of the Moscone Center construction in process would be sandblasted and laser etched onto a grey stone or metal panel that would be set, slightly recessed, into the wall.  Having the opportunity to transcribe this imagery onto the subterranean façade, close to the site of their creation would highlight the cyclical nature of dynamic urban change.”

Wayfinding Proposals

(Untitled)

(Untitled)

 Artists: Tom Otterness
Title: (Untitled)
“My initial ideas show the movement of life from above ground to the track level – using figures and buildings that are a cross between early constructivist abstraction and simple children’s building blocks. People are represented by four essential geometric forms: the sphere, the cone, the cube and the cylinder.  These abstract concepts can symbolize differences in race, class, culture and gender. The project will demonstrate the intermingling of all these different people on the platform of the subway, commuting to work, shopping with their families, carrying things here and there, and tourists with cameras on the way to museums. Like the city, the subway is a place where all types are welcome, where everyone converges and everyone is on equal footing.”

 

Untitled

Untitled

Artist: Mildred Howard
Title: Untitled
“Waiting for a train to arrive, you may daydream of people or events that happened at this site in the past or even some you just saw last week. Subway stations are an allegory of modern life, with movement, fleeting glimpses of people and random relationships, mysteriously acceptable. To capture these ideas and help people navigate through the space, I would install related art pieces at all three levels of the station, as if leaving bread crumbs as clues to find your way to and from a particular place. This method would incorporate an art piece repeated in different shapes and locations within the station. This led me to the idea of the grid of glass at various locations that reveals imagery, telling the rich history of the site and the diversity of people who use the station. It conveys the mystery of the experience of walking down into the earth to catch a train that will disappear into a black hole while I am on it!”

Radiant Rays

Radiant Rays

 Artist: Michele Oka Doner
Title: Radiant Rays
“Monolithic concrete, the primary construction material of the station, is by far the most potent factor to consider when responding to the mission statement. With this in mind I propose a work of art based on light.

Beginning with the glass curtain wall of the head house an expanding radiant pattern, evoking the sun’s rays, will dominate the entrance. This radial motion is designed with an actual vanishing point in mind. It establishes palpable tension in the visual surface of the head house glass wall, and serves to extend the sense of space to an imagined plane.

The lines themselves will be sandblasted into the glass curtain wall and tipped lightly with gold leaf, adding a high note of brilliance to the site.”

For more in-depth proposal information and images please visit the display at the Contemporary Jewish Art Museum or visit the San Francisco Arts Commission Web site and email your comments on the proposal to Zoe Taleporos, Program Associate (zoe.taleporos@sfgov.org).

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